Depression

What Is Depression?

Despite a surge in information on the topic of depression in recent years, there is still misunderstanding around what it actually means to be depressed. We all experience periods of sadness and low mood in response to stressful life events or a change in circumstances however, this is not the same thing as being depressed.

Depression is characterised by persistent low mood over time and affects multiple aspects of a person’s everyday life.

Depression changes how you feel, think and function in daily activities. It involves having negative thoughts about yourself, your world and the future. It can impair your ability to work, interact with others, sleep, eat and enjoy life. 

Note: the information provided in this module is not designed to diagnose you with depression but to demonstrate the consequences of depression and to point you in the direction of relevant resources to help you if you are struggling right now.

How Does This Link to the MyMynd Assessment?

If your indicator for depression was in the at-risk range following your assessment it means that you endorsed many items that assess symptoms of major depression. You may be experiencing significant distress in day to day life, have difficulty sleeping or sticking to a routine and your ability to perform simple tasks such as washing or getting dressed may be significantly impaired. If this is the case, we recommend that you SEEK MEDICAL HELP from your GP as soon as possible.

If you cannot wait to speak to your GP then please contact one of the helplines listed below.

Looking Back At Your Assessment Results

It is also important to consider that all of the indicators in the MyMynd assessment are fundamentally linked. This means that whether your score for depression is at-risk, optimal or somewhere in between, there are various tools that you can use to enhance your resilience and increase your coping ability. Take some time to revisit the Wellness Centre and look through all of your individual indicator scores.

The depression indicator is very closely linked to hope, happiness and social relationships. By working on improving your scores in these areas you will be better equipped to handle adversity and may also start to see improvements in other areas as a result. 

Hope

Happiness

Social Relationships

Looking after your mind is just as important as looking after your body and the tools we provide are designed to help you do that. 

Emergency Helplines

Samaritans

(24/7)

Call: 116 123

Website: samaritans.org

Calm

(5pm-midnight, Daily)

Call: 0800 58 58 58

Website: thecalmzone.net

Mind

(9am-6pm, Mon-Fri)

Call: 0300 123 3393

Website: mind.org.uk

Switchboard

LGBTQ+

(10am-10pm, Daily)

Call: 0300 330 0630

Website: switchboard.lgbt 

The Mix - under 25s

(3pm-midnight, Daily)

Call: 0808 808 4994

Website: themix.org.uk

Papyrus - under 35s

(9am-midnight, Daily)

Call: 0800 068 4141

Website: papyrus-uk.org

Download List Of Helplines

Emergency Text Services

Shout

(24/7)

Text ‘SHOUT’ to 85258

Website: giveusashout.org

YoungMinds

 (24/7)

Text ‘YM’ to 85258

Website: youngminds.org.uk

Accessing Support Services

 

If you would like to access further support or discuss any concerns with a qualified mental health professional, the organisations below provide free self-referral options for various talking therapy and counselling services.

Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT)

 IAPT is an NHS programme that was set up in 2008 with the aim of helping people better understand and manage their mental health.

The programme offers a range of talking therapy services, including cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT). CBT is one of the most commonly used and widely researched therapies for the treatment of anxiety and depression and works by providing practical coping strategies for dealing with different problems.

All therapies available through IAPT are evidence-based and delivered by fully trained and accredited practitioners.

To find your local IAPT service and complete a self-referral form, click on the button below and follow the instructions.

 

1. Click on the link below to open the NHS IAPT service finder.

2. Enter your postcode in the location search bar.

3. Click ‘search’ – you will be presented with a list of all the IAPT services offering CBT in your local area.

4. Click ‘sort by offers self-referral’ at the top of the page followed by ‘update results’.

5. Browse the information for each service i.e. opening hours, distance from your address etc. by clicking on the name of the service (underlined in red).

6. Once you have chosen a service that feels right for you, click on the link to the right of the service labelled ‘click here to access self-referral form.

7. Follow the on-screen instructions to complete the self-referral form (the information you are required to give in order to complete the self-referral proces may vary between services).

8. Submit your referral by clicking on the green ‘submit’ button at the bottom of the self-referral form.

Most services will contact you within 48 hours to confirm receipt of your referral and arrange an appointment with a practitioner – this contact will likely be a phonecall which will be displayed on your telephone as a private number.

Local Mind Services

Mind is a mental health charity which provides advice and support to anyone experiencing mental health problems.

They have a network of approximately 125 local Minds across England and Wales offering specialised support and care directly to those who need it most. The types of support available through local Minds varies depending on location but services include: talking therapies, peer support, advocacy, crisis care and more.

The main Mind website also provides emergency advice and urgent coping tools for use in crisis situations. You can access these at anytime by clicking here.

To find your local Mind service and complete a self-referral form, click on the button below and follow the instructions.

 

1. Click on the link below to open the local Minds service finder.

2. Enter your postcode in the location search bar.

3. Click ‘find’ – you will be presented with a list of all the Mind services in your local area.

4. Click on the local Mind that is nearest to your home address and follow the link to their website.

5. Explore the website for counselling and other support service availabilities (this information can usually be found under a “how can we help?” tab although website layouts do vary between services).

6. Once you have identified the support services that are available to you, follow the on-screen instructions to complete a self-referral for the service that feels right for you – this may involve calling Mind directly, in which case a phone number will be provided, alternatively, you may be required to fill out an online referral form.

7. The information you are required to give in order to complete the self-referral process may vary between services.

For online referrals, most services will contact you within 48 hours to confirm receipt of your referral and arrange an appointment with a wellbeing service worker – this contact will likely be a phonecall which may be displayed on your telephone as a private number.

Additional Resources

Below are some links to helpful articles and videos that provide more information on the theories and warning signs of depression as well as tips for managing symptoms.

 

 

More videos:

Readings: 

  • NICE Guidelines. This guideline covers identifying and managing depression in adults aged 18 years and older, in primary and secondary care.
  • Depression Management Package. Very extensive self-help guide for depression, provided by getselfhelp.co.uk. We do recommend to work through our resources first.
  • Vicious Cycles Of Depression. Describes the vicious cycles of depression and gives tips on how to break them.